Did water in Delhi boil due to the sun’s heat in the video? No, the viral claims are false!

As per the IMD, the malfunctioning sensor is the real cause of the high temperatures displayed in Delhi.

Claim

Heat in Delhi is making water boil

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Explanation

A plastic Sintex water tank filled with water is shown in the widely uploaded 22-second video. Numerous tanks surround it. Additionally, an infographic titled “Delhi Temperature 52 °+ degrees” is shown in the video. A voice in Hindi says, “Look, the water in the tank itself is boiling. Look at how hot it is in Delhi.”

He says that the rice will cook itself because of the heat if you put it in the boiling water in the tank. Afterward, he remarks, “I can’t imagine” if anyone uses or bathes in this water.

The video ends there and this post is shared with a claim “Heat in Delhi is making water boil.” Similar claim posts can be seen here and here.

What’s the truth?

We started our research by searching Google for the answer to the query, “What is the boiling point of water?” We found a USDA article with some questions and answers as a result of this. The paper states that “Water has a boiling point of 212 °F (100 °C).”

Since the viral video only displays 52 °+, which is not the boiling point of water, it is confirmed that it is spreading false claims.

Then we started our analysis with relevant keyword searches like ‘Delhi temperature 52 °+ degrees’ and ‘Water boils due to high temperature in Delhi.’

This led us to an article by The Indian Express dated June 1, 2024. The report is titled “Delhi’s maximum temperature of 52.9 degrees due to Mungeshpur station sensor error: IMD.”

According to the article, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) has stated that the reason Delhi’s Mungeshpur weather station recorded a maximum temperature of 52.9 degrees Celsius on May 29 was due to “malfunctioning of the sensor.”

IMD experts discovered that the temperature recorded by Mungeshpur’s automatic weather station (AWS) sensor was “roughly 3 degrees Celsius higher than the maximum temperature reported by the standard instrument.”

The result at Mungeshpur was “an outlier compared to other observatories in Delhi,” and it “exceeded the earlier all-time highest maximum temperature of 48.4 degrees at Palam on May 26, 1998,” according to the IMD, which formed an expert committee to examine the data.

Further, the article added that the India Meteorological Department (IMD) has said that the maximum temperature in Delhi was between 45.2 degrees and 49.1 degrees, not more than 52 degrees Celsius. Delhi’s Mungeshpur weather station recorded a maximum temperature of 52.9 degrees Celsius on May 29, it was on account of “malfunctioning of the sensor.

According to the IMD, the reason the gadget is displaying such high readings is because of a malfunction.

Conclusion:

Therefore, we conclude that the widely shared video that asserts Delhi’s heat is causing water to boil is false. As per the IMD, the malfunctioning sensor is the real cause of the high temperatures displayed in Delhi. Moreover, water boils only when it reaches 100 degrees Celsius.

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Indu Meenakshi

Indu Meenakshi is a former Microbiologist-turned-journalist, works as a Sub-Editor at YouTurn. She additionally holds Master’s in Management and English Literature. As a fact-checker, her job entails actively dispelling false information found online, exposing fake news, and raising public awareness.
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